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Mark Creegan

Artist, Assistant Professor of Drawing and Design at FSCJ, father to canines, friend, helpful citizen, spiffy dresser, latitudinarian 

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posted on 06.22.13

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Artist Websites
Creative Canibalism


I have been developing strategies to use the material on my artist website as a material for art rather than just a portfolio space. One would be to canibalize the images into new collage works which would also consist of some sort of process that would take into account the number of views the particular images have had. So the ones with the most views would be repeated/used the most times.


Another idea is to create some sort of guided video tour of the site with several different performative voices, one from myself, one from an artist friend, one from a curator, one from a random person, etc. This video would be available on the site so the viewer could follow along. 


The most radical idea I have had is to offer the site up for sale, basically auction off my entire ouvre-not the art pieces themselves- but the images of the art as it appears on this site. So I imagine someone who wants to be an artist, doesn't have the time, all they have to do is buy my site and attach their name and voila! they get an instant art career (such that it is!) complete with works, a resume, etc. This will be like my version of John Baldessari cremating all his paintings and displaying all of the ashes in an urn. I am not sure how to create the equivalent of the cookies however. http://talesofla.tumblr.com/post/32671883721/from-the-darkness-and-the-artistic-ashes-part-1

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Art Conundrum
Self Doubt


Putting together another online portfolio is both interesting and daunting. Basically, its self-curation where questions of what to include, what order to present, how much, whether or not to include details- all add up to some sort of narrative. Its a narrative that is self-driven and ultimately self-consumed (which leads to the daunting/sad part).


Any artist is going to be both the most and the least expert of his/her work. Any chance to organize one's work in the form of an exhibition (on or offline) provides both more clarity and more confusion. 


Taking a look back at my steps (sometimes missteps) I am both excited and puzzled. What is this? Why did I do this? Why is this even on this site? What is its purpose? What is it doing?


If I am the sole interpreter, organizer, admirer, is it even useful? 


Why am I putting so much attention to THIS portfolio rather than say Saatchi? Saatchi at least has the promise of some eyes seeing it (or so they say) as opposed to this ghost town. 


I never buy that. I think this space has a greater chance of a curator of the Whitney Biennial viewing my work than the glut of Saatchi.  I like ghost towns, I like to idea of putting up roots in a ghost town, so here I am. 


But, what if I am the ghost?

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posted on 05.24.13

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Is this a digital ghost town?


Its okay if it is, i am just wondering if I can pee on some tumbleweeds.

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posted on 05.24.13

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20th Century & Beyond
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Teaching
Duchamp
Change
Contemporary Art


 


 


My relationship to art is complicated. There is a certain reverence I have that is tainted with its opposite (irreverence?) As a teacher, I have to have some degree of reverence right? But as an artist I made a shift a long time ago due to circumstance and personality.


I remember not understanding Duchamp at all when I first learned about him. I was really put off by his confusing take. I mean, I had just spent a semester learning about the gods of art (Michelangelo, Rembrant, Cezanne, etc) and who is this clown besmirching all that with a toilet and a mustache on Mona Lisa? How dare he!


But time heals all wounds right? So jump to 2004, I am in a gallery in Chelsea and see these silver shapes on the wall. At first and from afar, I think this is some high tech thing (like a NASA material). When I get close however I see that these are in fact potato chip bags turned inside/out with holes punched with a.. holepunch, I laugh out loud.


Then and there I got Duchamp. But THEN, I ask the gallery lady how much the piece is and she tells me and then and there I get... Warhol, Koons, etc. Or maybe "get" is to vague , I see what they do, these moves they make are within my grasp all of a sudden. Their relationship to art and the world is understandable to me.


I am working on a paper for a panel session for SECAC. The topic is humor in art. As I formulate my thoughts the above story looms medium to large. I think this sort of Duchampian irreverence is fully embraced by contemporary art. Its no longer an offense BUT I still notice the same confusion and disgust I had towards Marcel in my students today. There is still opportunity to desecrate the gods in the minds of the yoots. 


The further funny thing is that Duchamp becomes a god himself right? I remember going to an art fair and seeing some of Franz West's adaptive pieces, these white plaster sculptures originally intended to be worn or adapted in some way by the audience. I asked knowing the answer if I could adapt it and was told no of course. I immediately thought "well is it the same work?" Probably not but maybe thats okay, It seems to me to be even funnier that we revere the work originally intended to punch holes in the holy realm of art. 


I like to be funny. I try anyway. Its probably a crutch masquerading as sincerity. Lets see where this goes...


 


image above is a work by Tony Feher.


 

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posted on 05.23.13

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20th Century & Beyond
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Art Criticism And Theory

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Visual Dialog
Blogs
Nostalgia
Hope
Promotion
New Beginnings
Hello

 


I miss blogs. Specifically I miss the early to late 00s when blogging was shiny and new and hopeful. I miss connecting with other artists and arts people. It seemed to shink the artworld in a way, make it seem a bit less monolithic. 


I know there are several art blogs still active, some great ones like hyperallergic, AFC, Bad at Sports, Daily Serving, etc. And even Edward Winkleman is still plugging along. But what is missing is the interaction, the involvement of the art community at large. Even Ed's blog has less comments/ commentors these days. 


I am just as much to blame for the drop in interactivity though! I am not sure why but it seemed like a huge shift happened around 2009/10 or so. Perhaps Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter took over? Reddit too? I am not knocking these at all but there is a lack of specificity and depth to these that the original blogs had. And debate! Remember PainterNYC? The trashing and passion! Oy!


I discovered A+C today even though I probably ran across it before in ads or emails. Reading the rationale and purpose of the site I like it very much, at least the intention of it, the fact that its not just an artist portfolio site but meant to create connectivity and dialogue. I am not sure how well that original intention has prospered though. Just a cursory browsing of blog activity and postings seems to be the typical self-promotion fare (or completely unrelated spam?). Nothing wrong with that, i just desire more these days.


I hope to post more of my thoughts here about art and teaching as well as develop some connections here. I am working on a couple of presentations that I think I could use this as a forum for development. Perhaps get some much needed feedback. And of course promote my art right? I mean what the hell.


 

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