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An archive is a repository for objects that have either gained value over time, or that are now recognised to contain value. I think some of the thoughts-or memories that we store in our subconscious can also act as a type of archive, because these ‘objects’ become pregnant with a particular type of historical value that is normally called nostalgia. In the case of my Star Wars obsession, this nostalgia for a science-fiction adventure movie series is imbedded in the geeky awe I felt when I first saw Star Wars.  Who can forget that moment when Darth Vader first slithered onto the decks of the Deathstar in Star Wars IV? Music is also a powerful catalyst for nostalgia: I remember being as obsessed with the music score as I was for the films; it was all part of this overwhelming and awe-inspiring cinematic experience: as a kid, whenever I heard the Star Wars’ theme on the radio I’d stop whatever it was that I was doing and listen with the utmost focus. I still get a certain feeling of dread when I hear Darth Vader’s Imperial March theme:  duh duh duh doo da duh doo da duh…

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“I hope Steven Spielberg will re do the star wars episode 4 to 6.. :)”
Posted over 2 years ago
GraceAnne says:
“Thanks for the link, Christopher-you're right, Cathy's work is spot on. You're right-working with the 'idea' of archive is a big one. At uni, I remember members of the faculty beginning an archival research team based on cataloguing older music recordings...it's now a nationwide mandate (for the UK, at least). But it's not just 'how' we look back, but what are we looking for (in a larger sense)...confirmation of the progression of technology? other confirmations? I've written a few acoustic pieces that relate to memory-but not as overt as your 'red door on a hillside'. ”
Posted over 4 years ago
“Some of work I've made in the past few years has a lot to do with archives and nostalgia (http://www.artandculture.com/media/show?media_id=86490&media_type=Image). Particularly how archives are made, with aid of various technologies, and how we look back into those archives through those technologies. I'm really interested in this topic, but I find it really hard to put to words... I think Cathy Wilkes is on to something related to this when she speaks in this interview: http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/turnerprize/turnerprize2008/artists/wilkes_video.shtm”
Posted over 4 years ago
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